Preserving honey and its texture

Let’s talk about crystallisation. Compact honey cannot be used right away, sometimes it is so solid you will not even be able to dive a tea spoon in it. However, this does not mean that solid honey is not good to eat. It is normal for honey to change texture through time, but that does […]

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Different bees like different things

Some species cooperate and distribute the work load among all the members of their colony. Only those species with a highly developed social organization can display such behaviours. Bees do. During the sixties scientists started studying bees. They noticed how not only them, but also other insects and animals tend to organize their colony on […]

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Eu bans neonicotinoids to save bees

Using pesticides is dangerous for both honeybees and wild bees. Farmers are using seeds treated with pesticides, so they grow contaminated crops. Spontaneous flowers growing on the edges of these crops get contaminated too. Insects pollinating these flowers pick up the pesticides. This is why in recent years bees have been dying more and more. […]

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Social immunity will save the bees

Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is a phenomenon caused by a variety of different causes. The list begins with parasitic diseases varroosis and nosemosis, which are the most widespread diseases among bees. They are followed by honeybee viruses such as the Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) and the deformed wings virus (DWV). Both viruses can be […]

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THE ROBOT THAT TRACKS DOWN SICK BEES

Bees, on which we rely to pollinate our crops, are decimating, but science is coming to our aid! Researchers have traced the movements of bumblebees by sticking QR codes behind them. They also created a system that tracks individual bees exposed to imidacloprid, a neurotoxin belonging to the group of neonicotinoid pesticides. Neonicotinoids are the […]

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